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Arts and Humanities

Horses were domesticated in the Northern Caucasus steppes and then spread across Asia and Europe

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Researchers from the Milá y Fontanals Institution (IMF) and the Institute of Archaeology (IAM) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), together with scientists from the Museum of Human Evolution (MEH), the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Extremadura (UEx), the UCM-ISCIII Joint Centre for Human Evolution and Behaviour in Madrid, the Laboratory of Prehistoric Archaeology of the University Jaume I of Castellón (UJI) and the Faculty of Geological Sciences of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) have participated in the largest genetic study carried out to date, which has made it possible to determine that the horses from which all current domestic horses descend were first domesticated in the steppes north of the Caucasus and, from there, spread to other regions of Asia and Europe. Read More

New research rewrites the version of the Inquisition on the relations between confessors and devotees

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University of Valencia researcher María Tausiet has analysed the power relations between priests and devotees, and the implication of the Inquisition in hiding them for four centuries. Within the framework of the CIRGEN European project, on gender identities and roles in Europe and America in the eighteenth century, endowed with 2.5 million euros in aid, the expert explains how many abuses and conspiracies were silenced, in order to keep up appearances.

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Research confirms photography and self-portrait as pedagogical resources for identity reconstruction

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Ricard Ramon, professor at the Faculty of Teacher Training at the University of Valencia, has researched the use of artistic self-portrait and photography as tools to achieve personal reflection and to also reflect on the surroundings of the individual represented. The conclusions confirm that the teacher training and visual and plastic arts students that have used it for self-conception and self-recognition are more aware of their own identity. Read More

The last Neanderthals of the Peninsula used local resources such as quartzite to make their tools

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Researchers Aleix Eixea, from the University of Valencia, and Joseba Rius-Garaizar, from the National Research Centre on Human Evolution (CENIEH), have published a study on the lithic technology of the last Neanderthals of the Iberian Peninsula retrieved from the Peña Miel site (La Rioja), one of the most recent dating sites. The study concludes that elements close to the site were mostly used such as quartzites, rather than flint, of great predominance in Neanderthal culture.

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The first Iberian lead plate found in a regulated excavation in the Pico de los Ajos in Yátova is in archaic writing

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A multidisciplinary research team from the University of Valencia (UV), the Prehistory Museum of Valencia (MPV) and the University of Barcelona (UB) has published a study detailing their discovery and interpretation of a lead plate with Iberian writing, the first one obtained in a regulated excavation in Pico de los Ajos (Yátova), one of the most important Iberian sites. This sheet, of archaic writing and an unknown theme, has been able to be phonetically transcribed and advances our knowledge of Iberian culture.  Read More

New research shows that Siberian Neanderthals ate both plants and animals

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Neanderthals, extinct cousins of modern humans, occupied Western Eurasia before disappearing and although it was once thought that they travelled as far east as Uzbekistan, in recent years an international research team with the participation of the University of Valencia discovered that they reached two thousand kilometers further East, to the Altai Mountains of Siberia. An international research team led by Domingo Carlos Salazar, CIDEGENT researcher of excellence at the University of Valencia, published today in the Journal of Human Evolution the first attempt to document the diet of a Neanderthal through a unique combination of stable isotope analysis and identification of plant micro-remnants in an individual.

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Fruit crops reached the eastern peninsula almost 3,000 years ago

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Guillem Pérez Jordà and Salvador Pardo Gordó, researchers from the Department of Prehistory, Archaeology and Ancient History of the University of València, sign an article in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports that looks into the arrival of fruit crops to the Iberian Peninsula by studying archaeobotanical remains. It is estimated that the cultivation of these species began in the current Valencian Community about 3,000 years ago, coinciding with significant social and economic development. Read More